joe rojas-burke

science journalist @rojasburke

September 15, 2014 at 2:07pm
12 notes
Reblogged from awesomearchives

awesomearchives:

Photogrammar is a web-based platform for organizing, searching, and visualizing the 170,000 photographs from 1935 to 1945 created by the United States Farm Security Administration and Office of War Information (FSA-OWI).

The above photos are from New Jersey, Hawaii, St. Paul, and Denver respectively. 

2:03pm
154,103 notes
Reblogged from trekual-innuendos

exfatalist:

trekual-innuendos:

Lets have a dystopian future movie where none of the actors are white

Not a single one

No reason

No explanation

There’s just no white people and not a single character questions it

Watch how quickly people notice and get pissed off

but wouldn’t it be better to put one white extra in the far background of a huge crowd shot for a few frames, so we could point to them every time someone gets pissed off?

(via copingwithexistence)

September 13, 2014 at 9:15am
0 notes
It gets even better: http://images.dailykos.com/images/104334/lightbox/TMW2014-09-10extended1.png?1410021152

It gets even better: http://images.dailykos.com/images/104334/lightbox/TMW2014-09-10extended1.png?1410021152

September 12, 2014 at 6:24pm
1 note

'fight like a girl' is no insult 

Athletes:

Mimi Nikolova Hristova of Bulgaria

Mariana Kolos of Ukraine

 Burcu Kebic of Turkey

Alma Jane Valencia of Mexico 

[Photos: Martin Gabor / United World Wrestling]

8:28am
6 notes
Blaming mothers, it seems, is an enduring reflex of our society.
Nineteenth century medical texts blamed birth defects and criminal tendencies on the mother’s diet, nerves and even the company women kept during pregnancy.
In the 1930s and 40s, neurologists attributed autism to “refrigerator mothers” lacking sufficient emotional warmth, a claim unsupported by evidence which nevertheless persisted as late as the 1970s.
Amid media hysteria in the 1980s and 90s about crack cocaine and “crack babies,” pregnant women who used crack had their children taken away and were sentenced to prison even as research revealed that fetal exposure to cocaine is no more harmful than exposure to tobacco or alcohol.
And now, careless portrayal of epigenetics and research on the developmental origins of disease poses a real threat to women, Richardson and colleagues say:

Although it does not yet go to the same extremes, public reaction to [developmental origins] research today resembles that of the past in disturbing ways. A mother’s individual influence over a vulnerable fetus is emphasized; the role of societal factors is not. And studies now extend beyond substance use, to include all aspects of daily life … exaggerations and over-simplifications are making scapegoats of mothers, and could even increase surveillance and regulation of pregnant women.

From The ‘science’ of blaming mothers’
[Image: Stages in pregnancy as illustrated in the 19th Century medical text Nouvelles démonstrations d’accouchemens, via the Wellcome Library] 

Blaming mothers, it seems, is an enduring reflex of our society.

Nineteenth century medical texts blamed birth defects and criminal tendencies on the mother’s diet, nerves and even the company women kept during pregnancy.

In the 1930s and 40s, neurologists attributed autism to “refrigerator mothers” lacking sufficient emotional warmth, a claim unsupported by evidence which nevertheless persisted as late as the 1970s.

Amid media hysteria in the 1980s and 90s about crack cocaine and “crack babies,” pregnant women who used crack had their children taken away and were sentenced to prison even as research revealed that fetal exposure to cocaine is no more harmful than exposure to tobacco or alcohol.

And now, careless portrayal of epigenetics and research on the developmental origins of disease poses a real threat to women, Richardson and colleagues say:

Although it does not yet go to the same extremes, public reaction to [developmental origins] research today resembles that of the past in disturbing ways. A mother’s individual influence over a vulnerable fetus is emphasized; the role of societal factors is not. And studies now extend beyond substance use, to include all aspects of daily life … exaggerations and over-simplifications are making scapegoats of mothers, and could even increase surveillance and regulation of pregnant women.

From The ‘science’ of blaming mothers’

[Image: Stages in pregnancy as illustrated in the 19th Century medical text Nouvelles démonstrations d’accouchemens, via the Wellcome Library] 

12:39am
3 notes

Mammut’s test events are brilliant. 

12:33am
2 notes

This updated accessibility icon has its critics but I think it’s a huge improvement. Here’s what the creators have to say about it: 

People with disabilities have a long history of being spoken for, of being rendered passive in decisions about their lives. The old icon, while a milestone in ADA history, displays that passivity: its arms and legs are drawn like mechanical parts, its posture is unnaturally erect, and its entire look is one that make the chair, not the person, important and visible. As people with disabilities of all kinds—not just chair users—create greater rights and opportunities for social, political, and cultural participation, we think cities should evolve their images of accessibility too.

September 11, 2014 at 7:57am
1 note
Photo of NYC taken on 9/11 from the ISS by Frank Culbertson via pourmecoffee

Photo of NYC taken on 9/11 from the ISS by Frank Culbertson via pourmecoffee

7:06am
16,181 notes
Reblogged from asylum-art

 fluxmachine gifs

Artist Kevin Weir creates ghostly animated GIFs using Archival photos from the Library of Congress

(Source: asylum-art, via kadrey)

September 9, 2014 at 5:01pm
365 notes
A jokey illustration from Mark Witton’s informative and fun post on the new African titanosaur fossil find. I love his suggestion at the end:

I’ve developed a real hankering for a good sauropod book. You know, a readable, fully referenced overview of their history of study, anatomy, palaeoecology, biomechanics, evolutionary history and diversity (so, nothing major then). I’m quite serious here: they’re an awesome, popular group of animals, fully deserved of their own semi-technical overview, ideally with lots of images to showcase their anatomy and habits. I’m sure this idea has sufficient legs to interest a major publisher. I lack the expertise to write it, so this is my attempt to plant a seed in the minds of those who can. For what’s it’s worth, I’d gladly help illustrate it: sauropods are fantastic fun to draw, and it’d be terrific to bring the diversity of this group to life in artwork.

A jokey illustration from Mark Witton’s informative and fun post on the new African titanosaur fossil find. I love his suggestion at the end:

I’ve developed a real hankering for a good sauropod book. You know, a readable, fully referenced overview of their history of study, anatomy, palaeoecology, biomechanics, evolutionary history and diversity (so, nothing major then). I’m quite serious here: they’re an awesome, popular group of animals, fully deserved of their own semi-technical overview, ideally with lots of images to showcase their anatomy and habits. I’m sure this idea has sufficient legs to interest a major publisher. I lack the expertise to write it, so this is my attempt to plant a seed in the minds of those who can. For what’s it’s worth, I’d gladly help illustrate it: sauropods are fantastic fun to draw, and it’d be terrific to bring the diversity of this group to life in artwork.