joe rojas-burke

science journalist @rojasburke

July 27, 2014 at 3:18pm
1 note
A saddleback caterpillar moth larva that’s been parasitized by a wasp
This photograph by Al Denelsbeck won the latest Panda’s Thumb photography contest.

A saddleback caterpillar moth larva that’s been parasitized by a wasp

This photograph by Al Denelsbeck won the latest Panda’s Thumb photography contest.

7:46am
2 notes
Reblogged from unexploredplanet
unexploredplanet:

Hydrothermal Vent Worms

"Hydrothermal vent worms are so tiny that you can’t see them. They live around the hydrothermal vents on the abyssal plain of the ocean floor. Fortunately, its mouth is less than a millimeter wide, but rest assured — if it could, that worm would devour everything you have ever loved."

http://www.cracked.com/article_19939_11-everyday-things-that-are-terrifying-under-microscope.html

unexploredplanet:

Hydrothermal Vent Worms

"Hydrothermal vent worms are so tiny that you can’t see them. They live around the hydrothermal vents on the abyssal plain of the ocean floor. Fortunately, its mouth is less than a millimeter wide, but rest assured — if it could, that worm would devour everything you have ever loved."

http://www.cracked.com/article_19939_11-everyday-things-that-are-terrifying-under-microscope.html

July 26, 2014 at 10:19am
0 notes

The inequality of violent death →

8:10am
1,233 notes
Reblogged from saturdaychores
saturdaychores:

Saturday Chores #6, July 5, 2014
This sign was all Grayson’s idea. I couldn’t stop laughing.

saturdaychores:

Saturday Chores #6, July 5, 2014

This sign was all Grayson’s idea. I couldn’t stop laughing.

July 25, 2014 at 3:53pm
1 note
It’s hard to think clearly about health reform if you ignore the social determinants of health, that is, how each person’s place in the hierarchy of self-determination and power, educational opportunity, neighborhood quality, working conditions, job security, income and wealth shape their vulnerability to illness and premature death. Check your knowledge by taking this true-or-false quiz:

1. Rates of illness and premature death are higher among the poor, but there is a threshold at which increases in social status no longer affect health. True or false?
2. Progress in recent decades has narrowed the entrenched inequalities in infant mortality and premature death that divide the U.S. population by socioeconomic class and race. True or false?
3. Expanding health insurance coverage and access to medical care (the focus of the federal Affordable Care Act) is unlikely to reverse the health disparities caused by the social determinants of health. True or false?
4. Food deserts – neighborhoods with few or no grocery stores selling fresh, affordable produce – are a well-defined root cause of obesity and other health problems in disadvantaged communities.True or false?
5. Price is not a significant driver of the unwholesome food choices that are prevalent among people on the lower rungs of the socioeconomic ladder. True or false?
6. Studies consistently find that when cities provide stable, subsidized housing to people with chronic mental health and substance abuse problems who live on the streets it saves taxpayer dollars by reducing the burden on law enforcement and hospitals. True or false?
7. African-Americans have levels of overall poverty that are two to three times higher than those of white Americans, and this explains the strikingly worse health outcomes among African-Americans. True or false?
8. Social disadvantage appears to accelerate aging at the cellular level. True or false?
9. Stress during fetal development – from a mother’s poor diet, for example, or exposure to pollutants – may set the stage for diseases decades later in life as an adult. True or false?
10. Intensive day care for infants and toddlers in disadvantaged homes may produce health benefits that persist into adulthood. True or false?

Get the answers here.
Reblogged from the Association of Health Care Journalists

It’s hard to think clearly about health reform if you ignore the social determinants of health, that is, how each person’s place in the hierarchy of self-determination and power, educational opportunity, neighborhood quality, working conditions, job security, income and wealth shape their vulnerability to illness and premature death. Check your knowledge by taking this true-or-false quiz:

1. Rates of illness and premature death are higher among the poor, but there is a threshold at which increases in social status no longer affect health. True or false?

2. Progress in recent decades has narrowed the entrenched inequalities in infant mortality and premature death that divide the U.S. population by socioeconomic class and race. True or false?

3. Expanding health insurance coverage and access to medical care (the focus of the federal Affordable Care Act) is unlikely to reverse the health disparities caused by the social determinants of health. True or false?

4. Food deserts – neighborhoods with few or no grocery stores selling fresh, affordable produce – are a well-defined root cause of obesity and other health problems in disadvantaged communities.True or false?

5. Price is not a significant driver of the unwholesome food choices that are prevalent among people on the lower rungs of the socioeconomic ladder. True or false?

6. Studies consistently find that when cities provide stable, subsidized housing to people with chronic mental health and substance abuse problems who live on the streets it saves taxpayer dollars by reducing the burden on law enforcement and hospitals. True or false?

7. African-Americans have levels of overall poverty that are two to three times higher than those of white Americans, and this explains the strikingly worse health outcomes among African-Americans. True or false?

8. Social disadvantage appears to accelerate aging at the cellular level. True or false?

9. Stress during fetal development – from a mother’s poor diet, for example, or exposure to pollutants – may set the stage for diseases decades later in life as an adult. True or false?

10. Intensive day care for infants and toddlers in disadvantaged homes may produce health benefits that persist into adulthood. True or false?

Get the answers here.

Reblogged from the Association of Health Care Journalists

July 24, 2014 at 3:40pm
0 notes
Behold: The Māori solar system!
Mercury is Whiro
Venus is Kōpū, also Koopuu Taawera or Meremere Tuu Ahiahi
Earth is Papatuanuku, also Te Ao
Earth’s moon is Marama
Mars is Matawhero
Jupiter is Kopu-nui, also Hine-i-tīweka or Paeaarau
Saturn is Pareārau
As I understand it, the outer planets had no traditional Māori names. Uranus is barely visible to the naked eye, and Neptune and Pluto were only discovered after the invention of telescopes.
More at The Encyclopedia of New Zealand and Science Alive!

Behold: The Māori solar system!

  • Mercury is Whiro
  • Venus is Kōpū, also Koopuu Taawera or Meremere Tuu Ahiahi
  • Earth is Papatuanuku, also Te Ao
  • Earth’s moon is Marama
  • Mars is Matawhero
  • Jupiter is Kopu-nui, also Hine-i-tīweka or Paeaarau
  • Saturn is Pareārau

As I understand it, the outer planets had no traditional Māori names. Uranus is barely visible to the naked eye, and Neptune and Pluto were only discovered after the invention of telescopes.

More at The Encyclopedia of New Zealand and Science Alive!

July 23, 2014 at 3:54pm
0 notes
Weather radar captured a massive hatch of mayflies emerging from the Mississippi River on July 20, 2014: 

The mayflies were detectable on radar around 845 pm and reports in the towns and cities began rolling in of the swarming and piles of mayflies…
While the emergence of mayflies from their river bottom mud dwelling can occur at various times through the warm season depending on the species, this particular emergence was that of the larger black/brown Bilineata species. [via the National Weather Service]

This looping gif shows the radar imaging from around 8:30 p.m. to just after midnight. The colors from green to yellow denote higher concentrations of flies.

Weather radar captured a massive hatch of mayflies emerging from the Mississippi River on July 20, 2014: 

The mayflies were detectable on radar around 845 pm and reports in the towns and cities began rolling in of the swarming and piles of mayflies…

While the emergence of mayflies from their river bottom mud dwelling can occur at various times through the warm season depending on the species, this particular emergence was that of the larger black/brown Bilineata species. [via the National Weather Service]

This looping gif shows the radar imaging from around 8:30 p.m. to just after midnight. The colors from green to yellow denote higher concentrations of flies.

July 22, 2014 at 6:01pm
0 notes

Latest gecko-inspired design: 

A way to stick microscale semiconductors onto plants, insects & other things with surfaces rough, irregular and tough to stick to.  Jongho Lee & colleagues demonstrated the concept with “geckoprinted” micro solar cells.

[The paper is in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface]

11:10am
1,313 notes
Reblogged from victongai

victongai:

Silicon Valley Lady Warrior

Victo Ngai

3 illustrations accompany the profiling of the feisty Shanley Kane by Elizabeth Spiers. Kane, a feminist publisher, started her own media company Modern View Culture in the male dominating Tech environment in 2013. She’s known for her outspokenness when taking on the worst of Silicon Valley (and sometimes her allies, too). 

Read the story and check out AD Erich Nagler’s beautiful layout design here on Medium. 

Big thanks to Erich, whom I have enjoyed working with during his NYTimes days, for this challenging assignment! 

(via whirligig-of-time)

July 20, 2014 at 3:11am
914 notes
Reblogged from brucesterling
brucesterling:

*US embassy in Berlin, July 19, 2014

brucesterling:

*US embassy in Berlin, July 19, 2014