joe rojas-burke

science journalist @rojasburke

July 23, 2014 at 3:54pm
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Weather radar captured a massive hatch of mayflies emerging from the Mississippi River on July 20, 2014: 

The mayflies were detectable on radar around 845 pm and reports in the towns and cities began rolling in of the swarming and piles of mayflies…
While the emergence of mayflies from their river bottom mud dwelling can occur at various times through the warm season depending on the species, this particular emergence was that of the larger black/brown Bilineata species. [via the National Weather Service]

This looping gif shows the radar imaging from around 8:30 p.m. to just after midnight. The colors from green to yellow denote higher concentrations of flies.

Weather radar captured a massive hatch of mayflies emerging from the Mississippi River on July 20, 2014: 

The mayflies were detectable on radar around 845 pm and reports in the towns and cities began rolling in of the swarming and piles of mayflies…

While the emergence of mayflies from their river bottom mud dwelling can occur at various times through the warm season depending on the species, this particular emergence was that of the larger black/brown Bilineata species. [via the National Weather Service]

This looping gif shows the radar imaging from around 8:30 p.m. to just after midnight. The colors from green to yellow denote higher concentrations of flies.

July 22, 2014 at 6:01pm
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Latest gecko-inspired design: 

A way to stick microscale semiconductors onto plants, insects & other things with surfaces rough, irregular and tough to stick to.  Jongho Lee & colleagues demonstrated the concept with “geckoprinted” micro solar cells.

[The paper is in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface]

11:10am
1,293 notes
Reblogged from victongai

victongai:

Silicon Valley Lady Warrior

Victo Ngai

3 illustrations accompany the profiling of the feisty Shanley Kane by Elizabeth Spiers. Kane, a feminist publisher, started her own media company Modern View Culture in the male dominating Tech environment in 2013. She’s known for her outspokenness when taking on the worst of Silicon Valley (and sometimes her allies, too). 

Read the story and check out AD Erich Nagler’s beautiful layout design here on Medium. 

Big thanks to Erich, whom I have enjoyed working with during his NYTimes days, for this challenging assignment! 

(via whirligig-of-time)

July 20, 2014 at 3:11am
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Reblogged from brucesterling
brucesterling:

*US embassy in Berlin, July 19, 2014

brucesterling:

*US embassy in Berlin, July 19, 2014

July 18, 2014 at 4:22pm
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Those white dots (circled in yellow) are polar bears visible from space in a high-res satellite image (Fig. A).

The red arrows point to white dots that can be ruled at as non-bear—they remain fixed in later images (Fig B) because they are rocks and other landscape features. Obviously, satellite imagery is a little short on detail compared to traditional capture programs and aircraft surveys, but the scientists pushing this idea say its a way to glean population data from sites otherwise too logistically challenging or costly to routinely access

The technology can open vast, remote regions to regular monitoring, facilitating the collection of data across species’ ranges and at global scales. Understanding and predicting shifts in abundance and distribution of wildlife is critical to evaluating the ecological impacts of a rapidly changing climate. With archives dating back nearly a decade, imagery provides the opportunity to establish short-term longitudinal data.

Citation:  Polar Bears from Space: Assessing Satellite Imagery as a Tool to Track Arctic WildlifeStapleton S, LaRue M, Lecomte N, Atkinson S, Garshelis D, et al., PLoS ONE (2014)

12:01pm
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Reblogged from fer1972

fer1972:

Upcycled Star Wars Junk Tech Busts by Gabriel Dishaw 

11:59am
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Some moments in my garden.

July 17, 2014 at 6:42pm
1,100 notes
Reblogged from arsanatomica

arsanatomica:

These are fins from a 500lb Bluefin Tuna

Tuna are members of the Scrombrid family, a group of fast swimming, partially warm-blooded apex predators, with highly streamlined bodies and retractable fins. 

In the image above, the large dorsal fin, with its rigid bony rays, can disappear completely into a deep groove on the body.This gives the fish its distinctive bullet shape, as it charges forward in the water. The fin is pulled out when the fish is slowing down, or turning to keep its cylindrical body from rolling over.

The distinctive little fins, or finlets in the last image are only found in this group of fish. Muscles beneath the skin allows them to move independently. There’s a few people out there researching this, but at the current time their exact function is unknown. 

(via ichthyologist)

July 15, 2014 at 12:24am
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Messenger boy working for Mackay Telegraph Co., Waco, Texas, 1913.
Photograph by Lewis Wickes Hine via the Library of Congress

Messenger boy working for Mackay Telegraph Co., Waco, Texas, 1913.

Photograph by Lewis Wickes Hine via the Library of Congress

12:15am
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El Paso’s Second Ward Neighborhood, 1972 
Photograph by Danny Lyon via the U.S. National Archives

El Paso’s Second Ward Neighborhood, 1972 

Photograph by Danny Lyon via the U.S. National Archives