joe rojas-burke

Portland-based science writer

February 1, 2013 at 4:19pm
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Microglial cells of the human brain, beautifully illustrated by Alois Alzheimer in 1911. Microglial cells are: 

the resident macrophages in the central nervous system. These cells of mesodermal/mesenchymal origin migrate into all regions of the central nervous system, disseminate through the brain parenchyma, and acquire a specific ramified morphological phenotype termed “resting microglia.” Recent studies indicate that even in the normal brain, microglia have highly motile processes by which they scan their territorial domains. By a large number of signaling pathways they can communicate with macroglial cells and neurons and with cells of the immune system. Likewise, microglial cells express receptors classically described for brain-specific communication such as neurotransmitter receptors and those first discovered as immune cell-specific such as for cytokines. Microglial cells are considered the most susceptible sensors of brain pathology. Upon any detection of signs for brain lesions or nervous system dysfunction, microglial cells undergo a complex, multistage activation process that converts them into the “activated microglial cell.” This cell form has the capacity to release a large number of substances that can act detrimental or beneficial for the surrounding cells. Activated microglial cells can migrate to the site of injury, proliferate, and phagocytose cells and cellular compartments.

source: Physiological Reviews

Microglial cells of the human brain, beautifully illustrated by Alois Alzheimer in 1911. Microglial cells are: 

the resident macrophages in the central nervous system. These cells of mesodermal/mesenchymal origin migrate into all regions of the central nervous system, disseminate through the brain parenchyma, and acquire a specific ramified morphological phenotype termed “resting microglia.” Recent studies indicate that even in the normal brain, microglia have highly motile processes by which they scan their territorial domains. By a large number of signaling pathways they can communicate with macroglial cells and neurons and with cells of the immune system. Likewise, microglial cells express receptors classically described for brain-specific communication such as neurotransmitter receptors and those first discovered as immune cell-specific such as for cytokines. Microglial cells are considered the most susceptible sensors of brain pathology. Upon any detection of signs for brain lesions or nervous system dysfunction, microglial cells undergo a complex, multistage activation process that converts them into the “activated microglial cell.” This cell form has the capacity to release a large number of substances that can act detrimental or beneficial for the surrounding cells. Activated microglial cells can migrate to the site of injury, proliferate, and phagocytose cells and cellular compartments.

source: Physiological Reviews

Notes

  1. itsomethingreat reblogged this from aculturedcitizen and added:
    I already has my histology test! And i pass it!!! Jujuju
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  16. virginiawoolftoday reblogged this from scientificillustration and added:
    sometimes, reading her poetic prose makes me feel like this looks … nerdgasm of nature / biology / beauty / art / truth.
  17. machinn reblogged this from joerojasburke
  18. cytoplasmicmembrane reblogged this from i-love-dna and added:
    Microglial cells of the human brain, beautifully illustrated by Alois Alzheimer in 1911.
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  21. ironladykati reblogged this from scientificillustration and added:
    I love this stuff